Fashion

Sunday Igboho: Benin Republic may reject Nigeria’s extradition request, says Akintoye

Sunday Igboho: Benin Republic may reject Nigeria’s extradition request, says Akintoye

A renowned historian, Emeritus Professor Banji Akintoye, has confirmed the arrest of Yoruba rights activist, Sunday Adeyemo, popularly known as Sunday Igboho. The PUNCH learnt that Igboho was arrested on Monday at an airport in Cotonou, Benin Republic. In a statement confirming the arrest, Akintoye who heads the umbrella body of Yoruba self-determination groups, Ilana Oodua, said he and others are “working to provide assistance for Ighoho to prevent his extradition into Nigeria,” saying “Benin Republic is a land that respects the rules of law.” He called on all Yoruba people “within and beyond the shores of Nigeria to come out and ensure that their ancestral land is not defeated by invaders.” The statement titled, ‘Ighoho: There’s A Strong Possibility That Extradition Request Of Nigerian Government May Be Rejected By Benin Republic – Akintoye,’ was signed by him and made available to newsmen by his Communications Manager, Mr. Maxwell Adeleye. It read in part, “I received last night the troubling information that Chief Sunday Adeyemo fondly called Igboho had been arrested at the Cotonou Airport. “I and other Yoruba Patriots who are immediately available are now working to provide the assistance necessary to ensure that nobody will be able to do to him anything unlawful or primitive and to prevent him from being extradited into Nigeria which is strongly possible. Read Also [Yoruba Nation agitator Sunday Igboho arrested in Cotonou] [Court moves Igboho aides’ suit from Sallah day] [Stop manhunt for Igboho, release loyalists, OPC tells Buhari] “Fortunately, Benin Republic is reliably a land of law where the authorities responsibly obey the law. We have secured the services of a leading and highly respected lawyer whom we can confidently rely on. “What the situation now calls for is that the Yoruba nation at home and in the diaspora must stand strong, resolved that neither Sunday Igboho nor any other Yoruba person will henceforth be subjected to inhuman or dehumanizing treatment of any kind. “We Yoruba nation are, by the grace of God, a very strong nation. We must arise now to show that strength. “For a start, we must all see to it now that Sunday Ighoho will get his freedom back so as to be able to move and operate as a free person. We all know he has committed no crime. “We know that some people are trying to suppress or even eliminate him only because he stood up to defend his kinsmen, women and children who are being massively killed and raped in their ancestral homeland; who are having their assets and means of livelihood destroyed, and who are facing ethnic cleansing and even genocide without having the benefit of protection by the rulers of their country. “We know, furthermore, that for the protection of his people who are being brutalized, he has joined hands with many of his brethren to take the legally appropriate step, namely to seek the intervention of the International Criminal Court,” Akintoye said.

Read More…

Converse Urban Utility Uses Gore-Tex to Keep the Water Out

The rain is drenching Darryl “Curtains” Jackson. It’s coming down in sheets from a machine overhead that’s been programmed to dump water droplets at the rate of 3.25 inches an hour. “This is a nice, steady rain,” he says, as drops fall from the ceiling and drain into the grated floor below. Curtains, Converse’s apparel director, is standing in the middle of the rain tower, a silvery box inside the biophysics lab at the Maryland campus of Gore, the company that makes waterproof and breathable Gore-Tex fabrics. The tower is designed to simulate nasty weather of all kinds—slanted downpours, harsh winds, insistent drizzle—so Gore can test the efficacy of the materials it manufactures. Even in this fabricated deluge, Curtains doesn’t need an umbrella. Today, he’s wearing a hooded black zip-up jacket and orange and green high-top sneakers. They’re part of the Urban Utility collection, a new line of weatherproof mens shoes and outerwear Converse has produced in partnership with Gore. Urban Utility is Converse’s first crack at truly technical products, and Curtains is putting them through the ringer. Ten minutes into the rain test, and the jacket and shoes are holding up. Curtains still isn’t wet. “I feel like I’m walking on dry land,” he says. The line is a departure for Converse. The Nike-owned brand, which just released its first collection of basic apparel last year, is new to clothes. At the same time, Converse’s shoes aren’t traditionally known for their ruggedness. A drizzly day can make the company’s trademark Chuck Taylor canvas sneakers feel like damp paper towels. For a certain type of consumer, the shoe’s lightweight flimsiness is part of its charm; the more weathered your Chucks, the better they look. Urban Utility, on the other hand, is designed to keep weather out. The company has a history of making utility shoes that’s rarely spoken about. When Marquis Mills Converse founded Converse in 1908, his company only produced galoshes and rubber work boots. Later, during World War II, Converse made footwear for soldiers. More recently, the company has collaborated with brands like Hunter to make waterproof Chuck Taylors and has designed a line of water-repellent sneakers . With Gore-Tex, Converse is attempting to build a more intentionally high-performance collection of goods. The shoes and jacket have Converse’s casual DNA on the outside and Gore’s technology on the inside. Adhered to the upper of the line’s three new pairs of shoes is a thin layer of Gore’s eponymous material. “You’ll never see the Gore-Tex unless you want to,” says Doug Crawford, an account manager at Gore who oversaw the collaboration with Converse. A few hours before Curtains found himself in the rain room, he, Crawford, and a handful of other Gore employees were touring a different suburban office building where the company conducts most of its shoe-related research. “This is typically the amount of sweat a human foot gives off over the course of a day,” says Jonathan Swegle, a footwear engineer at Gore, shaking a small vial of clear liquid. “It’s a lot of moisture.” Gore-Tex is designed to transfer sweat into water vapor, which allows it to pass through the thin lining material, reducing a shoe’s swamp-foot effect. Meanwhile, Gore-Tex’s pores are small enough—9 billion per square inch—that water droplets can’t get into the shoe from the outside. If Gore-Tex works, it should keep the foot warm and dry on a cold, rainy day, but cool on a hot day. Bob Gore first developed the material in the late 1960s when he abruptly yanked a heated rod of polytetrafluoroethylene, a polymer best known for its use in Teflon cookware, just to see what happened. When stretched quickly, solid PTFE expands by more than 800 percent, creating a thin, micro-porous material that is comprised of more than 70 percent air. Gore learned that he could tweak this bio-inert plastic to make it suit all kinds of applications, including medical implants and electrical cables. Its most mainstream use, though, came from fashioning the stuff into a paper-thin membrane that could be woven into clothes or used as lining to create breathable, water-resistant fabrics.

Read More…

News Categories

AWSOM Powered