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Resident Evil Origin Story Reboot Casts Jill Valentine, Leon Kennedy, Claire Redfield, and More

Resident Evil Origin Story Reboot Casts Jill Valentine, Leon Kennedy, Claire Redfield, and More

The Resident Evil origin story movie has cast nearly all of its major leads, including actors for Jill Valentine, Chris Redfield, Claire Redfield, Leon S. Kennedy, and Albert Wesker. This is yet another adaptation of Capcom’s survival horror series separate from a planned Netflix show .
Production firm Constantin Film and writer/director Johannes Roberts announced the cast for its Resident Evil origin story. Set in 1998 “on a fateful night in Raccoon City” the Resident Evil movie will star Kaya Scodelario (Maze Runner) as Claire Redfield, Hannah John-Kamen (Ant-Man and the Wasp) as Jill Valentine, Robbie Amell (Upload) as Chris Redfield, Tom Hopper (The Umbrella Academy) as Albert Wesker, Avan Jogia (Zombieland: Double Tap) as Leon S. Kennedy, and Neal McDonough (Yellowstone) as William Birkin. Resident Evil Origin Movie Cast Comparison 11 IMAGES According to director Johannes Roberts in a statement, “I really wanted to go back to the original first two games and recreate the terrifying visceral experience I had when I first played them whilst at the same time telling a grounded human story about a small dying American town that feels both relatable and relevant to today’s audiences.” Have you played Resident Evil?
YES NO It appears given Roberts’ statement and the cast that this origin movie will blend elements of the first two Resident Evil games. The first game stars Chris Redfield and Jill Valentine and is set in the Spencer Mansion, a dangerous compound full of lurking horror; while Resident Evil 2 stars Claire Redfield and Leon Kennedy on a really bad first night on the job in Raccoon City. Every IGN Resident Evil Game Review Ever 56 IMAGES The new movie is produced by Constantin Film, the same company that produced the previous Resident Evil movie series directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. Though it doesn’t appear related to the previous film adaptations.
This is also separate from the announced Resident Evil Netflix series which tells an original story about Wesker’s children after they move into “New Raccoon City.” And just because Netflix can’t get enough zombies, the streamer is also premiering a new, CGI animated film titled Resident Evil: Infinite Darkness as well. Meanwhile, Anderson, who kickstarted the last Resident Evil live-action film series is directing a live-action Monster Hunter movie.
This new origin movie is set to premiere in 2021.

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Some faith leaders say no to endorsing vaccine exemptions

Some faith leaders say no to endorsing vaccine exemptions If you’re seeking an exemption from a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, you might not get any help from your clergy person As significant numbers of Americans seek religious exemptions from COVID-19 vaccine mandates, some faith leaders are saying: Not with our endorsement. Leaders of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America said Thursday that while some people may have medical reasons for not receiving the vaccine, “there is no exemption in the Orthodox Church for Her faithful from any vaccination for religious reasons.” The Holy Eparchial Synod of the nationwide archdiocese, representing the largest share of Eastern Orthodox people in the United States, urged members to “pay heed to competent medical authorities, and to avoid the false narratives utterly unfounded in science.” “No clergy are to issue such religious exemption letters,” Greek Orthodox Archbishop Elpidophoros said, and any such letter “is not valid.” Similarly, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America issued a recent statement encouraging vaccine use and saying that “there is no evident basis for religious exemption” in its own or the wider Lutheran tradition. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York laid out its own stance during the summer, saying that any priest issuing an exemption letter would be “acting in contradiction” to statements from Pope Francis that receiving the vaccine is morally acceptable and responsible. Both the Vatican and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have said Catholics can receive the vaccines in good conscience given the lack of alternatives and the goal of alleviating suffering — even while objecting to research with even a remote connection to abortion. A number of dioceses have adopted policies similar to New York’s, and bishops in El Paso, Texas, and Lexington, Kentucky, have mandated vaccines for employees. But other Catholic jurisdictions are more accommodating of exemptions. The Colorado Catholic Conference, the policy arm of the state’s bishops, has posted online a template for a letter that priests can sign saying an individual parishioner may draw on Catholic values to object to the vaccines. South Dakota’s bishops have also taken that stance. At issue for many Catholics and other abortion opponents is that the most widely used COVID-19 vaccines were tested on fetal cell lines developed over decades in laboratories, though the vaccines themselves do not contain any such material. The issue is becoming more heated as public- and private-sector employers increasingly impose mandates. A clerical letter wouldn’t necessarily be needed for someone to be granted an exemption — federal law requires employers make reasonable accommodations for “sincerely held” religious beliefs — though a clergy endorsement could help bolster a person’s claim. The Rev. Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas, a Southern Baptist megachurch, said he and his staff “are neither offering nor encouraging members to seek religious exemptions from the vaccine mandates.” “There is no credible religious argument against the vaccines,” he said via email. “Christians who are troubled by the use of a fetal cell line for the testing of the vaccines would also have to abstain from the use of Tylenol, Pepto Bismol, Ibuprofen, and other products that used the same cell line if they are sincere in their objection.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not provide religious exemptions for vaccines for members, according to church spokesman Eric Hawkins. Leaders of the Utah-based faith have made pleas for members to get vaccinated even as doctrine acknowledges it’s up to individual choice. The church’s Brigham Young University has asked students to report their vaccination status but is not requiring vaccinations, and the church is also requiring U.S. missionaries serving in foreign countries to be vaccinated. Some other religious groups, such as the Orthodox Union, an umbrella organization for Orthodox Judaism, and the United Methodist Church, have encouraged people to get vaccines but have not issued policy statements on exemptions. The Fiqh Council of North America, made up of Islamic scholars, has advised Muslims to receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines and to debunk “baseless rumors and myths” about them. ——— Associated Press writers Brady McCombs in Salt Lake City and David Crary in New York contributed to this report. ——— Associated Press religion coverage receives support from the Lilly Endowment through The Conversation U.S. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

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